The class of pottery most characteristic of the Islamic world is luster ceramics. The shiny, metallic effect of its decoration was created by applying diluted metallic oxides to previously glazed earthenware that was then fired in oxygen-free kilns. The lack of oxygen generated a chemical reaction that fixed a thin metallic film on the objects surface. The decorative repertoire of luster ceramic vessels included excerpts of poetry, often of Sufi inspiration and figurative motifs, as shown in this example. This bowl was probably produced in the city of Kashan, Iran. Kashan emerged as a prominent center of luster ceramics production in the 12th century and remained so well after the Mongol invasions occurred in the mid-13th century.


Cataloguing data may change with further research.

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Artist
Persian (Kashan)
Title
Bowl with Seated Figure
Date
Early 13th century
Medium
Stonepaste, painted in luster on an opaque white glaze
Dimensions
3 3/4 × 8 3/4 × 8 7/8 in. (9.5 × 22.3 × 22.5 cm)
Credit Line

Museum purchase funded by the Honorable and Mrs. Hushang Ansary, the Brown Foundation Accessions Endowment Fund, and the Alice Pratt Brown Museum Fund

Current Location
The Caroline Wiess Law Building
111M NEW ACQUISITIONS GALLERY
Accession Number
2007.1302
Classification
Ceramics
Provenance

[Sotheby’s, London, October 17, 1996, sale LN6645, lot 20]; [Phoenix Ancient Art S.A., New York]; purchased by MFAH, 2007.