Boston chairmakers of the early eigh­teenth century had to compete with the very chairs that served as models. This chair with a caned back and seat, im­ported from London, displays turnings at the base of the rear legs and a high placement of the rear stretcher very similar to sophisticated caned chairs of Boston origin.

Technical notes: Caning not original.

Related examples: Yale (Forman 1988, p. 254); Concord Museum, Massachusetts (Wood 1996, p. 59, no. 24).

Book excerpt: Warren, David B., Michael K. Brown, Elizabeth Ann Coleman, and Emily Ballew Neff. American Decorative Arts and Paintings in the Bayou Bend Collection. Houston: Princeton Univ. Press, 1998.


Cataloguing data may change with further research.

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Maker
English
Title
Armchair
Date
c. 1685–1700
Medium
Beech and caning
Dimensions
48 3/4 × 26 × 24 1/4 in. (123.8 × 66 × 61.6 cm)
Credit Line

The Bayou Bend Collection, gift of Miss Ima Hogg

Current Location
Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens
PINE ROOM
Accession Number
B.58.142
Classification
Furniture
Provenance

Judge Jonathan Remington (1677–1745), Boston; Judge Edmund Trowbridge (1700–1793); Judge Francis Dana (1743–1814); Richard Henry Dana (1787–1870) [1]; by descent within the Dana family; Ginsburg & Levy, New York; purchased by Miss Ima Hogg, 1958; given to MFAH. [1] This information is provided on an engraved brass plaque affixed to the back of the chair.