Inspired by Surrealism’s embrace of chance and by the capricious movements of Alexander Calder’s sculptures, the Belgian artist Pol Bury created his own kinetic art beginning in the 1940s—motorized, spinning paintings, subtly shifting cut-paper reliefs, and slowly moving metal sculptures. In 1963 he created his first cinetization—a photo-collage suggesting movement within the print—an art form he pursued for the remainder of his career. By cutting concentric circles in a photograph and reassembling the pieces with a slight twist, Bury suggested a playful dance of volumes in what was then the world’s tallest building, the Sears Tower.


Cataloguing data may change with further research.

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Artist
Pol Bury, Belgian, 1922–2005
Title
Chicago
Date
1973 or later
Medium
Gelatin silver print collage
Dimensions
Image: 11 1/16 × 7 in. (28.1 × 17.8 cm) Sheet: 11 1/16 × 7 in. (28.1 × 17.8 cm) Mount: 15 3/4 × 11 13/16 in. (40 × 30 cm)
Credit Line

Museum purchase funded by the S. I. and Susie Morris Photography Endowment

Current Location
Not on view
Accession Number
2017.120
Classification
Photographs
Provenance

[Galerie 1900/2000, Paris]; [Paul M. Hertzmann, Inc., San Francisco]; purchased by MFAH, 2017.