November 2016

Amina Gautier, a Brooklyn native, is the author of three award-winning short story collections: At-Risk (University of Georgia Press, 2011), Now We Will Be Happy (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) and the The Loss of All Lost Things (Elixir Press, 2016). Her work has been recognized with the Flannery O’Connor Award, The First Horizon Award, the Eric Hoffer Legacy Fiction Award, the Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Fiction, the Florida Authors and Publishers Association President's Book Award, and the Chicago Public Library’s 21st Century Award, among others. She has also received grants from the Illinois Arts Council and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Gautier is an associate professor of English at the University of Miami, where she teaches in the MFA program. She lives in Miami and Chicago. 

November 2016

Margo Sawyer is professor of sculpture and extended media in the department of art & art history at the University of Texas at Austin. The central actor to her sculpture is color, and her most celebrated artworks Synchronicity of Color, Red and Blue at Discovery Green in Houston have become the icons of the city. She has exhibited her work in the United Kingdom, Italy, Japan, and the United States. She has received numerous grants and awards, most notably: The Rome Prize, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship, the Japan Foundation Visual Arts Fellowship, the National Endowment for the Arts Grant to Individuals, and two Fulbright Senior Research Fellowships. Recently, the 84th Texas Legislature named her 2015 Texas State Artist 3D. 

October–November 2016

Emma Franz is an Australian filmmaker and musician who draws upon on her passion for and experiences with music practice to inspire and inform her filmmaking. Music and film projects have taken her across six continents and 35 countries. Her debut feature, Intangible Asset Number 82, screened in competition at prestigious festivals around the world, garnering accolades and winning Best Foreign Documentary at the Durban International Film Festival 2009. Her second feature film, Bill Frisell, a portrait of a master guitarist, is set for festival release late 2016. Emma has been invited to present her work at the Smithsonian Institute, the Lincoln Center, the Museum of the Moving Image New York, the Australia Centre for the Moving Image, the National Sound and Film Archives Australia, and elsewhere. 

October 2016

Roderick Coover is the creator or cocreator of works of digital, interactive and emergent cinema and digital arts such as Toxi•City, Hearts and Minds: The Interrogations Project, and The Theory of Time. He is also the maker of documentary films and interactive, documentary research projects such as The Unknown Territories Project;'From Verite to Virtual: Conversations on the Frontiers of Anthropology and Documentary Film; The Language of Wine: An Anthropology of Work Wine; and The Senses and Cultures in Webs: Working in Hypermedia with the Documentary Image. He has been a pioneering creator of some of the earliest forms of interactive cinema and digital, ethnographic arts. His work blends arts and research, and conventional, disciplinary boundaries. His work is internationally exhibited and reviewed, and he has received Fulbright, Mellon, Whiting, and LEF awards, among others.

October 2016

Elizabeth Robinson is the author of several collections of poetry, most recently Counterpart (Ahsahta Press, 2012) and Blue Heron (Center for Literary Publishing, 2013). Her mixed genre meditation, On Ghosts (Solid Objects, 2013), was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award. She was educated at Bard College, Brown University, and Pacific School of Religion. Robinson has been the winner of the National Poetry Series, the Fence Modern Poets Prize, and a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists Award.  She has also been a fellow at the MacDowell Colony, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, and the Headlands Center for the Arts.  Robinson has taught at the University of Colorado, Naropa University, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and has twice served as the Hugo Fellow at the University of Montana. Currently she works as a court advocate for homeless people in Boulder, Colorado. 

September 2016

John Haskell is a Brooklyn-based writer whose books include I Am Not Jackson Pollock, American Purgatorio, and Out of My Skin. Essays and fictions have appeared in, among other publications, Lucky Peach, A Public Space, Conjunctions, and the David Salle Catalog for the Mary Boone Gallery. He is a contributing editor at BOMB and A Public Space, and his work for radio has been heard on WNYC's The Next Big Thing and Studio 360. He was awarded a 2010 New York Foundation for the Arts grant, and a 2009 Guggenheim Fellowship. He received his BA from University of California at Santa Cruz and an MFA from Columbia University

September 2016

Péter Zilahy is one of Hungary’s most exciting, diverse writers, the author of four books, has written for numerous international media outlets, including The New York Times and The Guardian. His dictionary novel, The Last Window Giraffe, has been translated into 22 languages. It has won multiple awards, among them the Book of the Year Prize in Ukraine, and is oft cited as one of the inspirations for the Orange Revolution. Zilahy has lectured at various universities over the years, including New York University, Tufts University, the New School, Melbourne University, the Tisch School of the Arts, and Girton College at Cambridge. He has been awarded numerous fellowships and residencies, among them the Albert Einstein Fellowship and the BMI-Kluge Fellowship at the Library of Congress. 

August–September 2016

LaMont Hamilton is an autodidactic, interdisciplinary artist based in Chicago. He works primarily in photography, film, and performance, including the modern dance piece Dapline! along with collaborator Andre Zachery of Renegade Performance Group. The New York Times called the piece “rich in emotional nuance and gestural beauty,” naming Dapline! as one of the best dance shows of 2015. Hamilton has been the recipient of several fellowships and awards, including the MacDowell Colony, Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship, Artadia Award, ArtMatters Grant, and the City of Chicago’s IAP Award. His residencies include Visiting Artist in Residence at Duke University in conjunction with African and African American studies, and SLIPPAGE: Performance|Culture|Technology and Bemis Center for Contemporary Art.

August 2016

Tania June Sammons is a Savannah-based curator and writer whose passion for art, architecture, history, and culture has resulted in dozens of exhibitions and publications. Exhibitions include Cheers!; Journey to the Beloved Community: Story Quilts by Beth Mount; Assembled and Cast: A Celebration of Contemporary Glass; Beyond Utility: Pottery Created by Enslaved Hands; The Art of Kahlil Gibran; The Story of Silver in Savannah: Creating and Collecting Since the 18th Century; and Gaming Tables for Whist, Chess, and Other Amusements. Her written work is published by Nineteenth Century, Magazine Antiques, Institut du Monde Arabe, University of Georgia Press, Georgia Museum of Art, University of Maryland, Telfair Museums, and others. Sammons has received numerous awards, grants, and scholarships, including the 2014 Kahlil Gibran International Award. As a Dora Maar Fellow, Sammons works on a biography about philanthropist and educator Mary Haskell Minis, patron of Lebanese American writer and artist Kahlil Gibran.

July–August 2016

David Adjmi recently finished a new full-length play about the composer Oscar Levant entitled The Stumble, and is developing Stereophonic with director Daniel Aukin and composer Will Butler of Arcade Fire. His plays, which include Marie Antoinette, Elective Affinities, 3C, Stunning, The Evildoers, Caligula, and Strange Attractors, have been produced nationally and internationally at such theaters as Steppenwolf, Lincoln Center, the Royal Court, the R.S.C., and Soho Rep—where he was the Mellon Foundation Playwright-in-Residence for three years. He holds commissions from Lincoln Center Theater, Yale Rep, Berkeley Rep, the Royal Court in the UK, and the Center Theatre Group, and was awarded the Guggenheim Fellowship, the Whiting Writers’ Award, and the Steinberg Playwright Award (the “Mimi”) among others. David's memoir, Save Us, Superman!, is forthcoming from HarperCollins.

July 2016

Mona Simpson is the author of Anywhere but Here, The Lost Father, A Regular Guy, My Hollywood, and Off Keck Road, which won the Heartland Prize from the Chicago Tribune and was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. She has received a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Guggenheim grant, a Lila Wallace Readers Digest Writers’ Award, and, recently, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Simpson is on the faculty at UCLA and also teaches at Bard College.

July 2016

Frederic Ramade created documentaries and short programs for TV Arte and France 5 in the areas of culture and education, before making his first film for the cinema. His work includes The Red Way, Ode to Suburbia, The Problem with Tom, and Liberating Chinon. Since 2010, Ramade joined the ACID (Independent Film Association for its Broadcast), which presents an independent program in Cannes. He is the current president of the association.

June 2016

Daniel Gwirtzman is a producer, educator, filmmaker, and dancer celebrating 21 years as a choreographer and company director. His diverse repertory is known for its humor, virtuosity, musicality, charisma, and accessibility. Gwirtzman directs the acclaimed New York–based Daniel Gwirtzman Dance Company, which performs nationally and internationally and has been called "a troupe I'd follow anywhere" by the Village Voice. In 2014, Gwirtzman celebrated the company's 15th anniversary with the premiere of The Oracle at the Brooklyn Academy of Music's BAM Fisher.

"Gwirtzman does know that in dance less can be more.”
New York Times

". . . a choreographer of high spirits and skill . . ."
New Yorker

May–June 2016

Khaled Al Khamissi  is an Egyptian novelist, columnist, lecturer, writer and cultural activist. His two fiction works, Taxi and Noah’s Ark, have been translated into many languages and have given Arabic and non- Arabic readers insights into the Egyptian society in the last decade. He published in 2014 his first nonfiction book: 2011. As a columnist, Alkamissi’s articles in Egypt and abroad show a blend of his background as a political analyst and fiction writer. He is now the chairman of the Greater public Library. Since the 1990s, he has been lecturing in the fields of culture and cinema in the Mediterranean. After the Egyptian revolution (2011), Alkhamissi’s involvement materialized in Doum, a cultural foundation he established with the aim of promoting critical thinking among the millions of Egyptians who dream of change. In 2014 he was appointed Chairman of board of the Greater Library of Cairo.
 

May–June 2016

Rebecca Chace is the author of several critically acclaimed works: Leaving Rock Harbor, Chautauqua Summer, and Capture the Flag, which Ms. Chace adapted for the screen with director Lisanne Skyler. She has written for the New York Times Magazine, New York Times Sunday Book Review, The Huffington Post, NPR’s All Things Considered, The Common Magazine (online), The L.A. Review of Books and other publications. Her first book for children, June Sparrow and the Million Dollar Penny, will be published by Harper Collins in 2017. She is director of Creative Writing at Fairleigh Dickinson University and also teaches in their MFA Creative Writing Program. She is a current fellow of the Wertheim Study at the New York Public Library.
 

May 2016

Stacey D’Erasmo is the author of the novels Tea, A Seahorse Year, The Sky Below, and Wonderland, and the nonfiction book The Art of Intimacy: The Space Between. She is a former Stegner Fellow, the recipient of a 2009 Guggenheim  Fellowship in Fiction, and the winner of an Outstanding Mid-Career Novelist Prize from the Lambda Literary Foundation. Her essays, features, and reviews have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, The New Yorker, The Boston Review , Bookforum, The New England Review, and Ploughshares, among other publications. She is currently a Visiting Associate Professor of Writing at Barnard College.
 

April 2016

Simone Glanert was born and raised in Germany. A graduate of the Sorbonne and a former Rudolf B. Schlesinger Fellow at Cornell Law School, Simone is a Senior Lecturer at Kent Law School (UK) where she teaches comparative law, French public law and legal interpretation. Her research focuses on the theory and practice of comparative law in the era of globalization. Simone’s monograph De la traductibilité du droit (Dalloz, 2011) critically assesses the possibilities and limits of legal translation from an interdisciplinary perspective. Having edited Comparative Law – Engaging Translation (Routledge, 2014), she has also acted as guest editor for a special issue on law and translation of The Translator (2014). During her time at the Dora Maar House, she will undertake final editorial work on a collection of essays, Law’s Hermeneutics: Other Investigations, to be released by Routledge in 2016.
 

April–May 2016

Mark Kendall is a filmmaker whose feature-length debut, LA CAMIONETA, was selected as a New York Times Critics' Pick and one of Fandor's “Best Political Films of 2013.” His work has screened at the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Gene Siskel Film Center, the Wexner Center for the Arts, and at film festivals such as SXSW, SANFIC, Los Angeles, and Guadalajara. Kendall is the receipient of a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship in Film/Video, and has also received fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, The Film Society of Lincoln Center, and the Sundance Institute. He graduated with a Masters in Fine Arts from the School of Visual Arts and currently lives in Philadelphia.

April 2016

Hillary Jordan is the author of the novels Mudbound and When She Woke, and the digital short “Aftermirth,” all published by Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. Mudbound won the 2006 Bellwether Prize for socially conscious fiction, and both it and When She Woke were long-listed for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. The two novels have been translated into ten languages.  Hillary is currently at work on a sequel to Mudbound called Fatherlands. She in lives in Brooklyn, NY.

March 2016

Jason Anthony is a nonfiction writer and author of Hoosh: Roast Penguin, Scurvy Day, and Other Stories of Antarctic Cuisine (UNP, 2012). He earned his MA in Poetry from the University of New Hampshire. Soon thereafter, he fled the warm world for Antarctica, where he filled his notebooks with the raw material for lyric essays, essays, and articles, some twenty three of which have been published since he last left the ice in 2004. One Antarctic essay was selected for The Best American Travel Writing 2007, and another was a Notable Essay in The Best American Essays 2006. He was the 2014 Literary Fellow for the state of Maine.
 

March 2016

Geri Doran is the author of two poetry collections, Sanderlings (Tupelo Press, 2011) and Resin (Louisiana State University Press, 2005), which won the Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets. Her poems have appeared in many journals, including New England Review, New Republic, Southern Review, Southwest Review, Ninth Letter, and Atlantic Monthly. She has received a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship. A native of northwestern Montana and graduate of Vassar College and the University of Florida, Geri currently teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Oregon. She will be working on a new manuscript of poems while in residence at the Dora Maar House.

March 2016

J. Morgan Puett is a trans-disciplinary creative producer with accomplished work in the areas of installation art practices, clothing and furniture design, architecture, fine art, film, and more – rearranging these intersections by applying conceptual tools including research-based methods in history, biology, new economies, design, craft and collaboration. Puett is the architect of The Mildred’s Lane Project, which continues to forge new ground citing that being is profoundly a social and political practice. Puett has been awarded the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Award in 2016, the John and Marva Warnock award in 2014, the United States Artists Simon Fellow Award in 2011, the Smithsonian Institution Artist Research Fellowship in 2009, and the Anonymous Was A Woman Award in 2005, amongst other grants. Puett exhibits, lectures and teaches extensively. Her work is in the Tate Modern in London, The Fabric Workshop and Museum of Philadelphia and in the Museum of Fine art, Philadelphia.
 

October–November 2015

Rajesh Parameswaran is a fiction writer and author of the short story collection I Am an Executioner: Love Stories (Knopf), one of the Washington Post's 50 Notable Works of Fiction for 2012. Born in India, he was raised in Texas and resides in New York City. His work has appeared in The Best American Magazine Writing, Fiction, Granta, McSweeney’s, and Zoetrope: All-Story. He has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and residences at the New York Public Library's Cullman Center; the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard; the MacDowell Colony; and Yaddo. His story “The Strange Career of Dr. Raju Gopalarajan” was one of three that earned McSweeney's the 2007 National Magazine Award for fiction. He holds a BA in English and a law degree from Yale. While at Dora Maar, Parameswaran is completing his first novel, Barren Island.
 

October 2015

Judith Simonian is a New York City painter who began her career in Los Angeles, where she was born. She is a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow and has received other awards including NEA fellowships, Gottlieb Foundation Grants, and a California Confederation of the Arts Grant. Her exhibition Foreign Bodies-Recent Paintings was held at Edward Thorp Gallery in New York City in March 2015. She exhibits her work widely in museums and galleries that include MoMa PS1, the New Museum, NY, Islip Museum, NY, the San Francisco Museum of Art, Kai Hilgerman Gallery in Berlin, Emmanual Heller in Tel Aviv, and in Japan at the Seibu Museum. During her stay at Dora Maar House she plans to paint alla prima with water-based oil paints, a medium and method she has wanted to explore for years.

September 2015

Marietta Hoferer was born and raised in Germany and has lived in New York since 1993. She studied at Hunter College in New York and at St. Martins School of Art and Design in London before receiving an MFA from Hochschule der Künste in Berlin. Recent solo exhibitions include Pro Arte Ulmer Kunststiftung, Ulm, Germany; Tenri Cultural Institute, New York; Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco, and Smack Mellon, Brooklyn. Selected group exhibitions include Apparently Invisible at The Drawing Center, New York City; Material Grid at Garvey/Simon, New York City; and Extended Drawing at Tegnerforbundet, Oslo, Norway. Her work is in the collections of Harvard Art Museums; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Weatherspoon Art Museum; Arkansas Arts Center; and Zimmerli Art Museum, among others.

September 2015

William Brown is a filmmaker and author who also teaches Film at the University of Roehampton, London. He is the author of Supercinema: Film-Philosophy for the Digital Age (Berhahn, 2013); the coauthor of Moving People, Moving Images: Cinema and Trafficking in the New Europe (St Andrews Film Studies, 2010); and the coeditor of Deleuze and Film (Edinburgh University Press, 2012). His feature films, all made in a 'guerrilla' style and on a shoestring, include En Attendant Godard, 2009; Afterimages, 2010; Common Ground, 2012; China: A User's Manual, 2012; Selfie, 2014; Ur: The End of Civilization in 90 Talbeaux, 2015; and The New Hope, 2015.

September 2015

Robert Perišić, born in 1969 in Split, Croatia, is an author of seven books, and also a playwright and screenwriter. He has published fiction and poetry titles in his native country, many of which have been translated into other languages. His bestselling novel, Naš čovjek na terenu (Our Man in Iraq), received the prestigious literary award Jutarnji list. The German edition of the received the Literaturpreis der Steiermärkischen Sparkasse 2011 in Graz, Austria. The English edition of the novel was published in 2012, and in 2013 the U.S. edition was released and gained praises from Jonathan Franzen, Miriam Toews, The New Yorker, NPR, The Toronto Star, the Times Literary Supplement, ZYZZYVA, and others. His new novel, Area without Signal, depicts a de-industrialized town and its hopes. While at Dora Maar he works on the drama, which links a female worker from the 19th century to her descendants, avant-garde artists.
 

August 2015

Jennifer Haigh is the author of four critically acclaimed novels: Faith, The Condition, Baker Towers, and Mrs. Kimble. Her books have won both the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction and the PEN/L.L. Winship Award for work by a New England writer, and have been published in 16 languages. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, she has been awarded an NEA grant and a James Michener fellowship. Her short fiction has been published widely, including The Atlantic, Granta, and The Best American Short Stories 2012. Her fifth book, the short story collection News from Heaven, won the 2014 Massachusetts Book Award and the 2014 PEN/New England Award in fiction. She lives in Boston.

August 2015

Emily Hass lives and works in New York City. She has been awarded grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the McCloy Fellowship in Art, and residencies at the MacDowell Colony, the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, and Gleis70 in Zürich, Switzerland. Selections from her series Altonaer Strasse were included in the 2011 Heimatkunde exhibition at the Jewish Museum Berlin and are now part of the museum’s permanent collection. Her work has been reviewed in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, seen in the New York Times and featured in Der Tagesspiegel. She has graduate degrees in psychology and design from Harvard University.
 

August 2015

Marina Shron is a Russian-born New York-based screenwriter/playwright/director. Her short films, including Sea Child and Lullaby for Ray, have been featured at film festivals around the world and have won awards including Best Short Film in Hamptons and Toronto. Buddha’s Little Finger, a feature she cowrote with Tony Pemberton, is forthcoming. Her plays—including King of Rats, Time and the Beast, and Eden—have been produced in New York, Berlin, and Moscow. She has received awards and funding for her work from Foundation for Contemporary Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, Jerome Foundation, and Fulbright Foundation. Shron teaches screenwriting at the New School University and is working on several projects as a writer-director, including narrative feature film X-Tina and an experimental feature, Songs of Love and War.
 

July 2015

Susan Barbour is a poet, writer, scholar, and sommelier. Her poetry has appeared in literary magazines including the Paris Review and Oxford Poetry, and her scholarship has appeared in journals including Textual Practice and the Oxford Review of English Studies. She earned a B.A. from Dartmouth College, an M.A. in writing from Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Oxford, where she was a Clarendon Scholar. She is completing the oenological studies for entrance into the Institute of Masters of Wine as research for a book on the poetics of smell. At the Dora Maar House she is completing her epistolary novel, To Xanadu, which concerns a poet temping as a secretary on Wall Street in the days preceding the global financial crisis. She is a research fellow in the humanities at the California Institute of Technology.
 

July 2015

Jeremiah Hulsebos-Spofford is a visual artist and teaches sculpture and contemporary practices at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work has been shown at the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the UCSD Art Gallery, the Glass Curtain Gallery, and the Hyde Park Art Center, among other spaces. His work has been supported by grants from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Harpo Foundation, the Propeller Fund, and an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship and a Fulbright Fellowship in Sicily. At the Dora Maar House he is working on a body of work called Anachronic Objects that includes Floating Museum, a collaborative public project with artist Faheem Majeed and architect Andrew Schachman in partnership with the DuSable Museum of African American History.   
 

July 2015


Anthony Swofford is the author of the memoirs Jarhead and Hotels, Hospitals, and Jails and the novel Exit A. A film adaptation of Jarhead was released in 2005. Swofford's writing has appeared in Harper’s, The Guardian, Slate, The New York Times and many other places. He has taught at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and Lewis and Clark College. He is developing a dramatic series for HBO and working on a biography of Carlos Arredondo, a hero of the 2013 marathon bombing in Boston.

June 2015

Carolle Bénitah was born in Casablanca, Morocco. After graduating from the École de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, Benitah worked as a fashion designer for 10 years. Her recent exhibitions include Le Maroc raconté autrement, official selection of Month of Photography Paris, at Galerie 127; Photos Souvenirs at Sous les Étoiles Gallery New York; 10 Contemporary Moroccans Photographers at the Museum of Marrakech for Photography; Tisser des liens at Pavillon de Vendôme in Aix en Provence; and J1 in the context of Marseille Cultural European Capital Provence 2013. Benitah’s work is part of the collection of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France; the Museum of Marrakech for Photography; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

June 2015

Angela Dalle Vacche is professor of film studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She has authored several books: The Body in The Mirror: Shapes of History in Italian Cinema, Princeton, 1992; Cinema and Painting: How Art is Used in Film, Texas, 1996; and Diva: Defiance and Passion in Early Italian Cinema, Texas, 2008. She has also produced anthologies, including The Visual Turn: Art History and Classical Film Theory, Rutgers 2002; co-edited with Brian Price, Color: A Film Reader, Routledge, 2010; and Film, Art, New Media: Museum without Walls, 2012. Dalle Vacche is currently working on a new book, Andre Bazin's Cinema: Art, Science, Religion. She has been the recipient of fellowships and grants from Fulbright Committee, and the Mellon, Rockefeller, and Leverhulme Foundations.


 

June 2015

Brenda Marie Osbey, a New Orleans native, is an author of poetry and prose nonfiction in English and French. Her books include History and Other Poems (Time Being Books, 2013); All Saints: New and Selected Poems (LSU Press, 1997), which received the American Book Award; Desperate Circumstance, Dangerous Woman (Story Line Press, 1991); In These Houses (Wesleyan University Press, 1988); and Ceremony for Minneconjoux (Callaloo Poetry Series, 1983; University Press of Virginia, 1985). She has been a resident fellow of the MacDowell Colony, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Camargo Foundation and others. She also has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louisiana Division of the Arts, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation, the Langston Hughes Society and others. In 2005 and 2007, she served as the first peer-selected poet laureate of Louisiana. Osbey is currently distinguished visiting professor of Africana studies at Brown University.
 

May 2015

Alex Jimenez Ruanova's recent compositions reveal folkloric influences from Latin America, and have been performed in several international forums and concert halls. He has received important commissions from music ensembles and orchestras, as well as numerous prizes and recognition. Ruanova has done extensive work producing, organizing, and leading projects, conferences, and master classes. Most recently he received a grant from the minister of culture FONCA–CONACYT in Mexico and was awarded a doctorate in composition at the Akademia Muzyczna w Krakowie, in Poland. During his time at the Dora Maar House, he is working on a composition for a small ensemble based on the play El Hombre Reloj (The Clock Man) by Mexican-American dramatist Juan Trigos.
 

May 2015

Justin Spring, a writer on 20th-century American art and culture, is the author of two interdisciplinary biographies: Fairfield Porter: A Life in Art and Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artist, and Sexual Renegade. Both examine the lives of artists whose work combined the practice of visual art with literature, poetry, criticism, and social and political activism. Secret Historian was a National Book Award finalist and the recipient of many other prizes. Spring received the Guggenheim and Leon Levy Biography Fellowships. In addition to his work as a biographer, Spring is an award-winning curator who has published many monographs and museum catalogues, most recently Andy Warhol: Fame and Misfortune. Spring's current biography project, tentatively titled American Gourmands in Paris, looks at the lives of seven American writers who learned about French food and wine from 1945 to 1975, the period remembered in France as les trentes glorieuses.

April–May 2015

Yemane I. Demissie is an award-winning independent filmmaker whose work includes two narrative feature films, Tumult and Dead Weight, as well as a feature documentary, Twilight Revelations: Episodes in the Life and Times of Emperor Haile Selassie. Demissie is producing The Quantum Leapers: Ethiopia 19301975, a six-part social history documentary series about the Emperor Haile Selassie era. Yemane is an associate professor in the undergraduate department of film & television at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.  He has received numerous awards for his work, including the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, the Walter Mosley Award for Best Documentary, the Berlin Prize, the American Film Institute’s Filmmaker’s Grant, the Paulin Vieyra Merit Award for Outstanding Work in the Cinema, the California Arts Council Artists Fellowship, and the Fonds Sud Writing Grant.  He has also been awarded residencies at Bellagio, MacDowell, Yaddo, and Bogliasco.
 

April 2015

Maureen Cassidy-Geiger is a New Hampshire native living in the orbit of New York City. An internationally recognized curator, scholar and lecturer specializing in European decorative arts, Meissen porcelain and the court of Saxony/Poland under kings August II and August III, her time at the Dora Maar House is devoted to completing the manuscript for The Grand Cure, an annotated edition of the travel diaries of the disabled Crown Prince of Saxony/Poland, Friedrich Christian (1722–63), who traveled incognito in Italy in 1738–40 for medical treatments and Catholic indoctrination during an improvised odyssey akin to a Grand Tour. Research on the unpublished diaries has thus far been supported by grants and fellowships from Wellesley College, DAAD, the Getty Museum, and Parsons New School University. Cassidy-Geiger has been a visiting scholar at the American Academy in Rome and the Fondazione Cini in Venice. Maureen’s book on the history of the Philip Johnson Glass House estate, a National Trust property with eleven structures and a landscape designed by the architect, is scheduled to be published in 2016.
 

April 2015

Richard Holeton is author of the critically-recognized hypertext novel Figurski at Findhorn on Acid (Eastgate Systems, 2001), other electronic and new media fiction, short stories, and college textbooks. His stories have appeared in Indiana Review, Mississippi Review, ZYZZYVA, Black Ice, and other journals. His electronic literature has been widely performed and exhibited and is anthologized in The Electronic Literature Collection, Vol. 1. Holeton has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the MacDowell Colony, and the California Arts Council. Previously he taught writing for 12 years at Stanford University, where he currently serves as director of academic computing services.

March 2015

Ken Kalfus is the author of three novels: Equilateral (2013), The Commissariat of Enlightenment (2003), and A Disorder Peculiar to the Country, which was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award and appeared in French as Un désordre américain. He has also published two collections of stories, Thirst (1998) and Pu-239 and Other Russian Fantasies (1999), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. Kalfus has received a Pew Fellowship in the Arts award and a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. He has written for Harper's, The New York Review of Books, and The New York Times. Pu-239, a film adaptation of his short story, aired on HBO in 2007. His new collection, Coup de Foudre: A Novella and Stories, was published in May 2015.

March 2015

Gavin Morrison is a curator and writer based in Scotland and the south of France, where he runs the project gallery IFF. He is also a director of Atopia Projects, a curatorial and publishing initiative. In 2015–2016 he serves as artistic director of the Skaftfell Centre for Visual Art, Seyðisfjörður, Iceland and previously he was the inaugural curator of Fort Worth Contemporary Arts. He is developing a monographic exhibition on the modernist architect Berthold Lubetkin for Tbilisi, Georgia, and is writing a book concerning cultural continuities between Scotland and Corsica.

March 2015

Seamus Scanlon is a writer from Galway, Ireland and currently based in New York where he is a Carnegie Corporation/ New York Times award winning librarian at the Center for Worker Education (City College). His short fiction collection As Close As You´ll Ever Be (Cairn Press, 2012) established the character of Victor M. McGowan who was the protagonist in the 2014 production of The McGowan Trilogy at the Cell Theatre in New York. The trilogy (published by Arlen House, 2014) won awards for Best Actress, Best Director and Best Design at the annual 1st Irish Theatre Festival in New York. It will also be produced in Galway in June 2015 by Wolf Meets World. The Spanish translation of his collection (Irlanda en el corazón) is due in 2015 from Artepoética Press.  At Maison Dora Maar he is working on his novel in progress - Black Coelacanths. Seamus is a graduate of the City College of New York, the University of West London and the National University of Ireland, Galway.

Past Fellows at the Dora Maar House

2014 Summer/Fall

2014 Spring

2013 Summer/Fall

2013 Spring

2012 Summer/Fall

2012 Spring

2011 Summer/Fall

2011 Spring

2010 Summer/Fall

2010 Spring

2009 Summer/Fall

2009 Spring

2008 Summer/Fall

2008 Spring

2007 Summer/Fall