Shiro Kuramata’s approach to designing objects was informed by the innovation in postwar Japan. By 1970, he had introduced alternative materials such as acrylic and glass into his furniture, which played on traditional ideas of materiality and form. Transparency, the appearance of weightlessness, and a Minimalist vocabulary quickly became his signature aesthetic. In 1976, Kuramata designed Glass Chair. Its reductivist and planar form reflects his interest in geometry as well as the effect of light as it transforms and illuminates the glass. Kuramata, like many of his Japanese contemporaries, looked to Western culture for inspiration. In particular, the sculptures of Donald Judd and Dan Flavin influenced Kuramata's furniture designs of the 1970s, such as this one.


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Designer
Shiro Kuramata, Japanese, 1934–1991
Manufacturer
Manufactured by Mihoya Glass Co., Ltd., Japanese, founded 1908
Title
Glass Chair
Date
Designed 1976
Medium
Glass
Dimensions
35 × 35 1/2 × 23 5/8 in. (88.9 × 90.2 × 60 cm)
Credit Line

Museum purchase funded by the Design Council, 2009

Current Location
Not on view
Accession Number
2009.505
Classification
Furniture
Provenance

[Friedman Benda Gallery, New York]; purchased by MFAH, 2009.