Period sources document a remarkably brisk transfer of design between urban and rural America. By the 1730s, within a decade of the Late Baroque’s earliest appearance in Boston, household inventories in Wethersfield list furniture forms revealing the style's introduction there. The design of both the Bayou Bend high chest and a related tea table in the collection (B.69.349) were clearly inspired by the Boston-Salem aesthetic. By the 1750s, when Wethersfield cabinetmakers began producing high chests with "crown tops,” the enclosed bonnet that is uniquely American, the style’s integration was complete.

Book excerpt: Warren, David B., Michael K. Brown, Elizabeth Ann Coleman, and Emily Ballew Neff. American Decorative Arts and Paintings in the Bayou Bend Collection. Houston: Princeton Univ. Press, 1998.


Cataloguing data may change with further research.

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Maker
American
Title
High Chest of Drawers
Date
c. 1750–1782
Medium
Cherry; eastern white pine and southern yellow pine
Dimensions
83 1/2 × 39 7/8 × 20 in. (212.1 × 101.3 × 50.8 cm)
Credit Line

The Bayou Bend Collection, gift of Miss Ima Hogg

Current Location
Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens
MAPLE BEDROOM
Accession Number
B.28.1
Classification
Furniture
Provenance

"By tradition, owned by Dr. Ezekiel Porter (1705–1775), Wethersfield, Connecticut, or his son-in-law and daughter, Colonel Thomas Belden (1732–1782) and Abigail Belden [1]; […] ; [Ginsburg & Levy, New York, 1928]; purchased by Miss Ima Hogg; given to MFAH.