By the turn of the 20th century, Minneapolis was a prosperous community with its own thriving Arts and Crafts industry. The city´s leading proponent of "artistic" design was John Scott Bradstreet, whose cooperative craft center, closely modeled on the utopian ideals of William Morris, produced imaginative interiors for a select clientele. One of Bradstreet's most creative works, this tabletop is carved as a lotus blossom, with the pedestal and base as its stem and roots. It has been treated with jin-di-sugi, a Japanese technique for artificially aging wood. The triumphant result is a combination of a traditional tea-table form, Japonisme, and American Art Nouveau design.


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Designer
John Scott Bradstreet, American, 1845–1914
Maker
Made by John Bradstreet & Co., American, 1873–1914
Title
"Lotus" Table
Date
c. 1905
Medium
Cypress
Dimensions
27 1/8 × 30 in. diameter (68.9 × 76.2 cm)
Credit Line

Museum purchase funded by Helena Woolworth McCann and the Winfield Foundation, by exchange

Current Location
Not on view
Accession Number
96.801
Classification
Furniture
Provenance

[Robert Edwards ]; purchased by MFAH, 1996.