The town of Gwalior in central India is home to an 8th-century fort. Although the fort was built by Hindu kings, its slopes were carved with magnificent sculptures representing Jain idols. These tirthankaras are spiritual guides who have been freed from the cycle of death and rebirth, and help others find the righteous path. Though the colossal statues have survived, many of the smaller ones were defaced under the 16th-century Mughal emperor Babur. The fort was the site of the 1857 uprising of Indian soldiers against the East India Company, although the British regained control of it in 1858.


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Artist
Samuel Bourne, British, 1834–1912
Title
[Rock Cut Sculptures in Happy Valley Fortress Gwalior]
[House, Allahabad]
Date
1860s
Medium
Albumen silver print from glass negative
Dimensions
Image/Sheet (.A): 8 7/8 × 11 7/16 in. (22.5 × 29 cm) Image/Sheet (.B): 9 7/16 × 11 in. (24 × 28 cm) Mount: 9 15/16 × 13 13/16 in. (25.2 × 35.1 cm)
Credit Line

Museum purchase funded by Joan Morgenstern

Current Location
Not on view
Accession Number
2018.4.A,.B
Classification
Photographs
Provenance

[Charles Isaacs Photographs, Inc., New York]; purchased by MFAH, 2018.