Robert Gober explores the uncertain relationship our bodies have with nature and architecture. This untitled work evolved out of a series of sculptures that trap the human form in the ordinary furniture and decor of middle-class America. Here, weirdly extended and scarred limbs sculpted from beeswax are woven among lathes cast in pewter. Despite their apparent fragility, the limbs remain unbroken, while the lathes bend and crack around them. Gober has refrained from commenting directly on this work; however, it can be understood as a testament to the persistence of life and memory in the face of aging and death.


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Artist
Robert Gober, American, born 1954
Title
Untitled
Date
2014–2015
Medium
Plaster, beeswax, human hair, epoxy putty, cast gypsum polymer, cast pewter, oil, and enamel paint
Dimensions
Overall: 41 × 47 × 7 in. (104.1 × 119.4 × 17.8 cm)
Credit Line

Museum purchase funded by the Caroline Wiess Law Accessions Endowment Fund

Current Location
Not on view
Accession Number
2016.222
Classification
Sculpture
Provenance

The artist; [Matthew Marks Gallery, New York]; purchased by MFAH, 2016.