Dora Maar Fellows in Residence

September 2014

Nina Burleigh is an award-winning investigative journalist and the author of five books. Her last book, The Fatal Gift of Beauty, was a New York Times bestseller. She is working on a book about American spies in dolce vita Rome. In the last several years, she has covered a wide array of subjects, from American politics to the Arab Spring. She writes the “Bombshell” column at The New York Observer and has written for numerous publications including Rolling Stone, Businessweek, The New Yorker, Time, New York, and The New York Times. Nina was born and educated in the Midwest, and she has traveled extensively in the Middle East and lived in Italy and France. Her book, Mirage (Harper Collins, 2008) was selected by The New York Times as an editors' choice and won the Society of Women Educators' Award in 2008.
 


September 2014

Cynthia Lin was born in Taiwan and grew up near Chicago, Illinois. She lives in New York and works in Bushwick/Queens. A John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 2006 allowed her to mount a solo show at Michael Steinberg Gallery, New York, where she exhibited monumental drawings of skin and scars. This led to group shows at Lehmann Maupin Gallery, Garis & Hahn Gallery, DeCordova Museum, Minneapolis Institute of Art, The National Academy of Design, The Drawing Center, ISE Cultural Foundation, and Weatherspoon Art Museum. She has received residency fellowships at Yaddo, The MacDowell Colony, The Space Program at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation, Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Blue Mountain Center, and the Visiting Artists and Scholars Program at the American Academy in Rome. She is an assistant professor of art at Purchase College, State University of New York. While at the Dora Maar House, she works on drawings of scars within and beyond the body.
 


August–September 2014

Poet and performance-maker Fiona Templeton directs the New York performance group The Relationship. She created the 1988 landmark work YOU-The City, “an intimate Manhattan-wide play for an audience of one,” and cofounded the Theatre of Mistakes in London in the 1970s. Her recent productions include The Medead at Roulette Brooklyn, on Governor’s Island, and at Glasgow Tramway; L’Ile, a staging of the dreams of the people of Lille, France, in the places dreamed of; Flow by Leslie Scalapino; and Bodies of Memory, a collective physical remembering of performances from the last 35 years, at Tate Britain. Her 12 books include YOU-The City, Cells of Release, Delirium of Interpretations, and Elements of Performance Art. She has received awards and fellowships from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, NYFA, in both performance and playwriting; the NEA, in both poetry and visual arts; and a Senior Judith Wilson Writer’s Fellowship at Cambridge. She teaches contemporary performance at Brunel University in London.


August 2014

Samuel Leader was born in South Africa, grew up in the United Kingdom and France, and has lived in the United States since 2001. He holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and modern languages from the University of Oxford and an MFA in fiction from UC Irvine. He was awarded a fiction fellowship twice from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and he was also was a writer in residence at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council in 2011. He teaches in the literary arts department at the Rhode Island School of Design. While at the Dora Maar House, he works on his novel entitled Dust, which is set in Southern France and has as its protagonist an aged demographer on trial for crimes against humanity.


August 2014

Patricia Trieb was born in Saginaw, Michigan, and lives and works in Brooklyn. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at Wallspace, New York (2013), Tibor de Nagy, New York (2012), and Golden Gallery, Chicago (2010). Selected group exhibitions include Modern Talking at the Cluj Museum, Cluj, Romania (2012); Expanded Painting, Prague Biennale 5, Prague, Czech Republic (2011); Besides, With, Against, And Yet: Abstraction and The Ready-Made Gesture at The Kitchen, New York (2009). Treib was a 2013 MacDowell Colony Fellow and a Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation grantee in 2007. She received her MFA from Columbia University and her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.


July 2014

Milagros de la Torre has been working with the photographic medium since 1991. Her first solo exhibition, curated by Robert Delpire, was presented at the Palais de Tokyo, Centre National de la Photographie, Paris. After an artist residence grant from the Cité des Arts, Paris (1995), she received the Rockefeller Foundation Artist Grant and was awarded the Romeo Martinez Photography Prize and the Young Iberoamerican Creators Prize for her series The Lost Steps. De la Torre received the Guggenheim Fellowship in Creative Arts, Photography, in 2011. Her work has been exhibited extensively and is part of permanent museum collections in Europe and America. Two important monographs have been recently published: Milagros de la Torre. Photographs 19912011’by Toluca Editions (Paris), RM Editorial (México/Barcelona) and Ediciones Lariviére (Argentina) with a text by Marta Gili, Director of the Jeu de Paume Museum, Paris; and Observed, co-published by the Americas Society, New York, and the Museo de Arte de Lima with an interview between the artist and Anne Wilkes Tucker, The Gus and Lyndell Wortham Curator of Photography at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Born in Lima, Peru, de la Torre lives and works in New York.
 


July 2014

Goldie Goldbloom's novel, The Paperbark Shoe, won the AWP Novel Award (2008) and Novel of the Year from the Independent Publishers' Association. Her collection of short stories, You Lose These and other stories, was published by Fremantle Press in Australia, and her fiction has appeared in Prairie Schooner, Kenyon Review, Tri-Quarterly, and Narrative Magazine. She was a recent recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and spoke at the International Forum on the Novel in 2013. She writes the blog Frum Gay Girl, a series of interviews with LGBT Orthodox Jews. She is a professor of creative writing at Northwestern University. Goldie was born in Western Australia but currently lives in Chicago, Illinois, with her eight children.
 


July 2014

Kathleen Winter’s debut poetry collection, Nostalgia for the Criminal Past (Elixir Press, 2012), won the Antivenom Prize and 2013 Texas Institute of Letters Bob Bush Memorial Award. She has received residency fellowships from James Merrill House Foundation, Vermont Studio Center, and the Prague Summer Program. Her poetry was featured for a year in the City of Phoenix, Seventh Avenue Streetscape Public Arts Project 2010. Kathleen holds an MFA from Arizona State University; JD from the University of California, Davis; MA from Boston College; and BA from the University of Texas at Austin. Her poems appear in such journals as The New Republic, Tin House, Poetry London, AGNI, Stand and The Cincinnati Review. She teaches at Napa Valley College.


April–May 2014

Alice Miceli received a BA from the Ecole Superieure d'Etudes Cinematographiques, in Paris, and an MA from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro. Her work has been exhibited in numerous international venues, including the Sao Paulo Biennial; the Japan Media Arts Festival inTokyo; the TRANSITIO_MX festival in Mexico City; the transmediale festival in Berlin; the Sydney Film Festival; Z33 Contemporary Art Space in Belgium, the Images Festival in Toronto; the Mediations Biennial in Poland, and at ZKM in Karlsruhe, among others. She has had solo exhibitions at Nara Roesler Gallery and the Tomie Ohtake Institute in Sao Paulo, and at Max Protetch Gallery in New York. Alice is a recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, and the Bogliasco Foundation, among others. During her fellowship, Alice plans to work on the final stages editing her exploration of photographic representations of land mines.
 


April 2014

James Cañón was born and raised in Colombia. He received his MFA from Columbia University. His debut novel, Tales from the Town of Widows & Chronicles from the Land of Men, has been translated into eleven languages and published in over twenty countries, and was made into a film. He won the Prix du Premier Meilleur Roman Étranger, and the Prix des Lecteurs de Vincennes, and is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships, including the Henfield Prize for Excellence in Fiction, an NYFA artist fellowship, and residency fellowships from MacDowell, Yaddo, Blue Mountain Center, and Hawthornden International Retreat for Writers, among others. James’s short stories and essays have appeared in various literary journals in the United States, Mexico, France, Belgium, and Colombia. He serves as graduate thesis advisor at Columbia University’s creative writing department. While at Dora Maar House, James plans to work on his forthcoming novel, The Church of Common Sense.
 


April 2014

Luljeta Lleshanaku  was born in Elbasan, Albania. She studied Albanian philology & literature at the University of Tirana and later received an MFA from Warren Wilson College, in the United States. She has worked as a schoolteacher, literary magazine editor, screenwriter, television author, and researching director of the Institute of Study of the Communist Genocide in Albania. She was awarded fellowships at the University of Iowa international writing program in 1999 and at Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in 2008–2009. She is the author of six books of poetry in the Albanian language and the author of six poetry collections in other languages: Antipastoral (2006, Italy); Kinder der natur (2010, Austria); Dzieci natury (2011, Poland); Haywire: New & Selected Poems (Bloodaxe Books, 2011, UK); Fresco: Selected Poems (New Directions, 2002, U.S.), and Child of Nature (New Directions, 2010, U.S.). She has received wide recognition and awards for her work internationally. At the Dora Maar House, she plans to work on a collection of poems as a response to three generations of family photos.


March 2014

Maren Stange is professor of American studies and visual culture at the Cooper Union in New York. Her publications on photography and its social contexts include Bare Witness: Photographs by Gordon Parks; Bronzeville: Black Chicago in Pictures; Symbols of Ideal Life: Social Documentary Photography in America, 18901950; Official Images: New Deal Photography; and the forthcoming Photography and the End of Segregation. She has held fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Yale University, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Durham University, England, and has lectured widely in Europe and America. At the Dora Maar House she is working on completing Photography and the End of Segregation.


 


March 2014

Joel Dreyfuss has been editor-in-chief of technology publications Red Herring and Information Week, editor of PC Magazine, a senior writer at Bloomberg Markets, managing editor of TheRoot.com, executive editor of Black Enterprise, and editor-in-chief of Urban Box Office, an Internet startup. He also served two stints at Fortune magazine, first as an associate editor and Tokyo bureau chief, and later as a senior editor and personal technology columnist. Joel’s freelance articles have appeared in the New York Times Magazine and Book Review, the Los Angeles Times, Redbook, The Progressive, and other national publications. He is an accomplished musician with credits as a sideman on several albums. He is a cofounder of the National Association of Black Journalists and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. While at the Dora Maar House, he is working on a book about the 300-year history of his family in Haiti.
 


March 2014

Laura Talamante is an associate professor of history at California State University, Dominguez Hills. She earned her PhD in history at UCLA, where her dissertation, “Les Citoyennes Marseillaises: Women and Political Change during the French Revolution,” won the Mary Wollstonecraft Dissertation Award. She has received numerous honors and awards, including a residency fellowship at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France; a National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture grant; and two French American Cultural Exchange Tournée Festival of French Films grants, among others. While at the Dora Maar House, she is working on a collaborative manuscript with French colleagues entitled, Sex, Scandal and Power Relations: From Marseille to Venice, Conjugal Disturbances, Elites and Society in the Eighteenth Century.


October–November 2013

Marie Ducaté is an artist who lives and works in Marseille. She works in glass, ceramic, fabric, and tapestry, as well as with watercolors, crumpled paper, embroidery, and light. Marie has exhibited internationally, including “Radieuse” at cité radieuse, Le Corbusier, Marseille. She has had large public commissions in Lyon, Saint Fons, and Marseille. Her work has been collected by the cities of Paris, Marseille, Narbonne, Lyon, Bathune and Martigues, as well as by FNAC Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, FRAC, and Musée Fodor, Amsterdam. Her work has been widely written about, including an article in Côté sud by Anna Galet. Last year she completed an artist book, publications d’artistes, exposition au Baux de Provence, published by la fabrique sensible.


September–October 2013

Christiane Paul is associate professor. at the School of Media Studies, The New School, and adjunct curator of new media srts at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She has written extensively on new media arts and lectured internationally on art and technology. Her recent books are Context ProvidersConditions of Meaning in Media Arts, co-edited with Margot Lovejoy and Victoria Vesna; New Media in the White Cube and Beyond; and Digital Art. As adjunct curator of new media arts at the Whitney Museum of American Art, she curated several exhibitions—including Cory Arcangel: Pro Tools, Profiling, Data Dynamics, and the net art selection for the 2002 Whitney Biennial—as well as artport, the Whitney Museum’s website devoted to Internet art. While at the Dora Maar House, Christiane is working on her forthcoming book, A Companion to Digital Art.


September 2013

Greg Pierotti is cowriter of the teleplay The Laramie Project, which won the Humanitas Prize and garnered an Emmy nomination for outstanding writing for a movie. He was an associate writer of the play The Laramie Project, from which the screenplay was adapted. The play received the Bay Area Critic’s Circle Award for outstanding achievement in the theater and garnered nominations for both a NY Drama Desk Award for best play and a GLAAD media award. Fourteen years after its world premiere, The Laramie Project continues to be one of the most produced contemporary plays in the United States. He was the head writer of the play The People’s Temple, which retells the story of the rise and fall of Jim Jones’s notorious religious and political organization from the members’ perspectives. He is co-writer of The Laramie Project:10 Years Later, which he recently performed in Repertory with The Laramie Project at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. He teaches a course in devising theater in the MFA programs at University of Maryland and Naropa University. While at the Dora Maar House, Greg is working on Apology, a play and interactive installation that interrogates the story and impact of The Apology Line—a “secular confessional” operated on the home answering machine of New York artist Allan Bridge from 1980 to 1995.


September 2013

Kathy Grove manipulates and alters photographs. Among her projects, in The Other Series she seamlessly removed the female figures in famous photographs and paintings such as Thomas Hart Benton's Persephone. Groves' work is in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Musee de l"Elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland, among others. She has widely exhibited throughout the United States, including in New Art on Paper at Philadelphia Museum of Art; Image Interrupted, Boston Center for the Arts; and Quotations, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art. While at the Dora Maar House, Kathy plans to work on a series of composited photographs which wed the past with the present.
 


August 2013

Maud Casey is the author of two novels, The Shape of Things to Come, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and Genealogy, and a collection of stories, Drastic.  Her novel The Man Who Walked Away is forthcoming from Bloomsbury.  She has received international fellowships from the Fundacion Valparaiso, the Hawthornden International Retreat for Writers, Chateau de Lavigny, and Villa Hellebosch, and is the recipient of the Calvino Prize. She lives in Washington, D.C. and teaches in the MFA Creative Writing Program at the University of Maryland. While at the Dora Maar House, Maud plans to work on a collection of linked short stories.

 


August 2013

Donna Stonecipher is the author of three books of poetry: The Reservoir (2002); Souvenir de Constantinople (2007); and The Cosmopolitan (2008). Her poems have been published widely and have been translated into French, German, Czech, Spanish, Slovak, and Dutch. She also translates from French and German, and her translation of Swiss author Ludwig Hohl’s novella Ascent was published in 2012. She received her PhD from the University of Georgia and her MFA at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.  She won the National Poetry Series and the Contemporary Poetry Series competitions, and is the recipient of numerous awards, grants and fellowships including Truman Capote and Teaching-Writing fellowships at the University of Iowa, a Presidential Fellowship at the University of Georgia, and residency fellowships from Yaddo, the Millay Colony for the Arts and Hawthornden International Retreat for Writers, among others. While at Dora Maar House, she is working on a book of poems that engages with ornament and the controversies surrounding it.
 


July–August 2013

Asti Hustvedt is an independent scholar and the author of Medical Muses: Hysteria in Nineteenth-Century Paris. She has a PhD in French literature from New York University, and is the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including a Phi Beta Kappa Fellowship. She is the editor of The Decadent Reader: Fiction, Fantasy and Perversion from Fin-de-Siècle France and has published many translations. She lives in New York City with her husband the artist Jon Kessler. While at the Dora Maar House, Asti plans to work on her next book, which explores the intersections between medicine and culture, gender and diagnosis, illness, and cure.


July– August 2013

Jon Kessler received a B.F.A. from SUNY at Purchase and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program. He has exhibited his work widely in Europe, Japan, and the United States. He has sculptures in the permanent collections of many institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. He has received several NEA grants, the St. Gaudens Memorial Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Foundation for the Performing Arts grant. He is a professor at the School of the Arts at Columbia University.  He lives in New York City with his wife, Asti Hustvedt. While at the Dora Maar House, Jon plans to focus on two-dimensional work. 
 


July 2013

Eric Pankey is the author of nine collections of poetry, most recently TRACE (Milkweed Editions 2013). His work has been support by fellowships from the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Winner of the Academy of American Poets' Walt Whitman Award, he teaches at George Mason University where he is Professor of English and the Heritage Chair in Writing. While at the Dora Maar House, Eric would like to complete work on a sequence of twenty eighteen-line poems called “Speculations,” which mediate on the nature of perception, knowing and consciousness.
 


July 2013

Temenuga Trifonova is Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at York University in Toronto. She is a film scholar, photographer, and filmmaker (she is the writer, director and producer of the feature film Man of Glass, 2012). Temenuga is the author of The Image in French Philosophy (Rodopi, 2007) and the edited volume European Film Theory (Routledge, 2008). Her third book, Warped Mind, is under contract with Amsterdam University Press. Her articles have appeared in a number of peer-reviewed journals. Her photography was exhibited at EAGL gallery in Berlin and she was artist-in-residence at Pushkinskaya 10 Art Centre in St.Petersburg, Russia. While at the Dora Maar House, Temenuga will be working on an article, “Cinematic Photography: The Photographic Image in the Digital Age.”
 


June 2013

Myriam Bornand is a French-Swiss artist, who works in multiple mediums: paint, collage, photography, video, texts and installations. Her work has been exhibited in France and internationally, including  Musée Ingres, Le Ministère de la Culture in Paris, le MACA, la Gaité Lyrique. In 2010/2011 she presented a solo exhibition around the actress Charlotte Rampling at la Galerie Porte Avion in Marseille. Most recently her work was included in the collective show Ekphrasis, which gathered writers with visual artists, and was curated by CO AR CO. She currently works and lives in Marseille, France.

 


June 2013

Kaui Hart Hemmings is the author of a story collection, House of Thieves, and the Descendants, a novel that has been published in twenty countries and made into an Academy Award-winning film.  She lives in Hawaii.


 


June 2013

Pola Oloixarac was selected as one of the Best Spanish Novelists by Granta. Pola's debut novel The wild theories is available en seven languages. She has held literary fellowships at Yaddo, the International Writers Program at Iowa, the Amsterdam Writers Residence in Netherlands, and MEET Maison des Ecrivains Etrangers et Traducteurs à Saint Nazaire, France. Pola contributes articles on literature and technology for several media such as New York Times International, Folha de Sao Paulo, The Telegraph UK, Rolling Stone and Pagina 12, among others.

 


May 2013

Jennifer Grotz is the author of The Needle and Cusp, as well as translator of Patrice de la Tour du Pin's Psalms of All My Days. Her poems, translations, and reviews have appeared widely in journals such as New England Review, Kenyon Review, The New Republic, The Nation, as well as in Best American Poetry and Pushcart prize anthologies. She teaches at the University of Rochester and also serves as Assistant Director of the Bread Loaf Writers Conference.


 


May 2013

Pamela Newkirk is professor of journalism at New York University and author of Within the Veil: Black Journalists, White Media, which was awarded the National Press Club's 2001 Arthur Rouse Award for Media Criticism. She is also editor of Letters from Black America: Intimate Portraits of the African American Experience (Beacon Press, 2010); and A Love No Less: Two Centuries of African American Love Letters (Doubleday, 2003). Her articles on race, media and African American art and culture have appeared in numerous publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, Artnews, and The Columbia Journalism Review.   She has lectured widely throughout the U.S. and in London on media diversity and African American portrayals in popular culture, and is a fellow at The Nation Institute. Newkirk holds a Ph.D. in comparative and international education and a master's in journalism from Columbia University.


 


May 2013

Liz Ward’s artwork is informed by natural history and the environmental crisis. Exhibition venues include the Museum of Fine Arts and the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; the Weatherspoon Museum in North Carolina, and the International Print Center, New York. Her work is in the Whitney Museum and The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston collections, among others. She received an M.F.A. from the University of Houston, and a B.F.A. cum laude from the University of New Mexico. Her work has been recognized with two Mid-America Arts Alliance/NEA Fellowships, and the Dozier Travel Award from the Dallas Museum of Art. She lives and works in Castroville, Texas.


 


April 2013

Natalka Bilotserkivets is a Ukranian poet, translator, and essayist. Graduate of the Kyiv University, she worked for the journal Ukrainska Kultura as editor, section editor, and editor-in-chief. Since 2010, she lives from writing. Her poetry was translated into a dozen of European languages, primarily Polish, German, and English. It was anthologized, inter alia, in New European Poets (Saint Paul, 2008), Vorwarts, Ihr Kampfschildkroten. Gedichte aus der Ukraine (Heidelberg, 2006), Hotel Parnassus (Amsterdam, 2002), A Hundred Years of Youth: An Anthology of 20th Century Ukrainian Poetry (Lviv, 2000), From Three Worlds. New Writing from Ukraine (Boston, 1996). She holds a number of literary awards, including “Agni” award for the best translated poetry, and “Crystal Vilenica” for the best poetry at the International Festival. While at Dora House, she will be working on her first novel “The Life of My Man”.


 


April 2013

Mykola Riabchuk is Senior Research Fellow at the Ukrainian Center for Cultural Studies in Kyiv, and a member of the editorial boards of Krytyka, Nowa Europa Wschodnia and the Journal of South Eastern Europe. He graduated from the Lviv Polytechnic Institute and the Gorky Literary Institute in Moscow. He is the author of many books including collections of essays De la ‘Petite Russie’ á l’Ukraine, L'Harmattan 2003, and  Die reale und die imaginierte Ukraine, Suhrkamp 2006. He has also written many articles on civil society, state and nation building, nationalism, national identity, and post-communist transition in the post-Soviet countries, primarily in Ukraine. He is vice president of Ukrainian PEN Centre.


 


March-April 2013

Amy Yoes works in a multi-faceted way, alternately employing painting, photography, installation, video, and sculpture. An interest in decorative language and architectural space permeates all of her work. She responds to the formal topologies of ornament and style that have reverberated through time, informing our mutually constructed visual and cultural memory. Adding to  this multileveled aesthetic unfolding, Yoes’ work plays in the realm of human connectedness. She grew up in Houston and in Chicago, where she attended the School of the Art institute of Chicago. She lives and works in New York City. She is currently working with fellow artist Mark Dion on Above/Below Ground, a collaborative project for the Siena Art Institute in Italy.


 


March 2013

Composer Richard Festinger has achieved international recognition for his extensive catalogue of chamber, vocal and orchestral compositions.  Since 1990 he has been a professor of composition at San Francisco State University where he is also Artistic Director of the Morrison Artists chamber music series.  Before turning to composing he led his own groups as a jazz performer.  Festinger received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in composition from the University of California, Berkeley, and in the mid 1980’s co-founded the San Francisco based modern music ensemble Earplay.  His music is published by C.F. Peters Corporation and his works have been recorded for the Centaur, Bridge, CRI and CRS labels.   He has received major awards from the Jerome, Fromm. Koussevitzky, Barlow, and Argosy foundations, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Aaron Copland Fund, the American Composers Forum, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters.


 


March 2013

Helen Longino received her PhD in Philosophy from The Johns Hopkins University.  Her teaching and research interests are in philosophy of science, social epistemology, and feminist philosophy.  She is particularly interested in the relations between scientific inquiry and its social, cultural, and economic contexts.  Longino is the author of Science As Social Knowledge (Princeton University Press, 1990), The Fate of Knowledge (Princeton University Press, 2001) and Studying Human Behavior, a study of the relationship between logical, epistemological, and social aspects of behavioral research (University of Chicago Press, 2013). Longino is currently Clarence Irving Lewis Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University.

 


October–November 2012

Evelyn Toynton is a writer of novels, essays, book reviews and most recently a biography, Jackson Pollack (Yale University Press, 2012) which was an Amazon Book of the Month in February. Her novel The Oriental Wife(Other Press, 2011) has been bought by Magnus Films, who have commissioned a screenplay. Her earlier novel,  Modern Art (Delphinium Books/Harper Collins 2000) was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She has written for Harpers, The American Scholar, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Book Review, and the Times Literary Supplement, among other publications.  While at Dora Maar House Toynton is working on a new book-length manuscript.
 


October–November 2012

Nadine Pinede, the daughter of Haitian immigrants, graduated from Harvard magna cum laude. As a Rhodes Scholar, she earned her Masters in English and French literature from St. John’s College, Oxford University. She has a Ph.D. from Indiana University and an M.F.A from the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts. She is author of a poetry chapbook, An Invisible Geography, and her fiction was included in Haiti Noir, edited by Edwidge Danticat. The French edition of Haiti Noir was recently published in Paris by Editions Asphalte. While at Dora Maar, Dr. Pinede finished her novel, inspired by Zora Neale Hurston's research in Haiti, for which she received an Elizabeth George Foundation grant.
 


October 2012

Anne Vilsbøll is a Danish painter, author and curator. She has been acclaimed one of the pioneers searching to revive the ancient craft of papermaking as a contemporary art form.  Her work has shown internationally. Vilsbøll has worked on several commissions, including the Foreign Ministry, Skæring Church, Rolex, Chatelain Odense University Hospital, Music and Theatre House in Silkeborg, Viborg Stadion, and the ferry Maersk Delft, sailing between Dunkerque and Dover. She has explored speciality paper in the Far East, Australia, Africa, North and South America and Europe and written several books and articles on the subject.. In 2000 Vilsbøll went to India to collaborate with Indian miniature painters. While there she bought a hotel in Udaipur, Rajasthan, which has been transformed into an artist-in-residence house. She lives and works in St. Jeannet, France, in Udaipur, Rajasthan and in Copenhagen, Denmark. While at the Dora Maar House,Vilsbøll continued work on her series of paintings “Les Doyennes and Les Doyens de Provence,” portraits of people between 80-100 years old.
 


October 2012

Rachel Tzvia Back is a poet, translator, and professor of literature. She teaches English Literature at Oranim College in Kiryat Tivon, Israel. She has lectured widely in the US and has been the scholar-in-residence at numerous universities including Dartmouth, Wesleyan, Barnard, Princeton, Cabrini, and more. She has published several books of poetry, including the recently published collection A Messenger Comes: Elegies, as well as translations of significant Hebrew poets, including the most extensive selection of the poetry of Lea Goldberg in English to date. It was awarded a PEN Grant in 2005. Back's family has lived for seven generations in Jerusalem and the Galilee, where Back currently resides. While at the Dora Maar House she worked on a representative collection of works from preeminent Hebrew poet Tuvia Ruebner.
 


September 2012

Anzhelina Polonskaya was born in Malakhovka, a small town near Moscow. She has had numerous books of poetry published in Russia. In 2003, Polonskaya became a member of the Russian PEN-centre An English version of her book A Voice appeared in the acclaimed “Writings from an Unbound Europe” series at Northwestern University Press. This book was shortlisted for the Corneliu Popescu Prize for European Poetry in Translation. Translations of her work have appeared in World Literature Today, Poetry Review, American Poetry Review, and International Poetry Review. In October 2011 the “Oratorio-Requiem” Kursk, whose libretto consists of ten of Polonskaya’s poems debuted at the Melbourne Arts Festival. In 2012 a bilingual edition of her newer poems will be published by Zephyr Press under the title Paul Klee’s Boat. Polonskaya’s work has been translated into Dutch, Slovenian, Latvian, Spanish and other languages. She is preparing a new volume of poetry for publication.
 


August 2012

Peter Doroshenko is the Executive Director at the Dallas Contemporary. Before his arrival in Dallas, Doroshenko was the President and Artistic Director of the Pinchuk Art Centre, Kiev, Ukraine. He has held director and curator positions at the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, England; SMAK - Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Ghent, Belgium; inova (Institute of Visual Arts), Milwaukee; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; and Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse. Doroshenko has written or contributed to several books and numerous exhibition catalogues on artists' work. He published a monograph on collectors who have constructed their own personal museums entitled, Private Spaces for Contemporary Art (Rispoli Books 2010). In 2002, France awarded Doroshenko with the Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters.  While at Dora Maar he worked on his manuscript Wake-Up Call: How to Navigate the Art World Waters.
 


July-August 2012

Tilar Mazzeo is a scholar of comparative literature and cultural studies. She has her PhD in both English literature and in Theory and Criticism from University of Washington. She teaches British and comparative literature, material culture studies, and literary and cultural theory at Colby College. She is the author of Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period (University of Pennsylvania Press 2007), the New York Times best-selling biography The Widow Clicquot (Harper Collins 2008), and The Secret of Chanel No. 5 (Harper Collins, 2010). While at the Dora Maar House, Dr. Mazzeo completed her forthcoming book The Ritz at War.
 


July-August 2012

Nancy Bowen is a mixed media artist known for her eclectic mixtures of imagery and materials in both two and three dimensions. Like an artistic archeologist in this age of globalization and post-industrialization, she salvages (often disappearing) ornament and craft traditions and incorporates them into sculpture and drawings. Bowen has had solo exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe including the Lesley Heller Gallery and Annina Nosei Gallery in NYC; Galerie Farideh Cadot in Paris; the Betsy Rosenfield Gallery in Chicago; and the James Gallery in Houston. She has won awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, The MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, The Jentel Foundation and the European Ceramic Work Center among others. She is currently an Associate Professor of Sculpture at Purchase College, SUNY. She lives in Brooklyn and maintains a studio in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
 


July 2012

Greg Miller was named Mississippi Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Having served as chair of the English Department and President of the Faculty Council, Miller is a professor of English at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. The University of Chicago Press has published three books of Miller's poetry: Iron Wheel (1998), Rib Cage (2001), and Watch (2009); Mercy Seat press published Mississippi Sudan (2007).  Miller's George Herbert's 'Holy Patterns': Reforming Individuals in Community was published by Continuum in 2007, and his collaborative translations of and commentaries on George Herbert's Memoriae Matris Sacrum: "The the Memory of My Mother:  A Consecrated Gift"   by the George Herbert Journal Monograph Series (2012).  Miller's poems have appeared recently in Tikkun, Slate, Spiritus, and other journals. Greg Miller has been a writing fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Yaddo, MacDowell Colonies and at the Camargo Foundation. While at Dora Maar, Miller worked on a long prose essay about his work over the last ten years with Sudanese refugees The Lost Boys and Girls of Sudan and his travels in South Sudan.
 


June 2012

Lisa Williams' two books of poetry were recognized with the Barnard Women Poets Prize and the May Swenson Poetry Award. She also received the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, among many other honors and awards. She is currently Director of Creative Writing and Associate Professor of English at Centre College in Kentucky. While at Dora Maar House she worked to complete a third volume of poetry.


 


May–June 2012

Suzanne Opton is a photographer based in New York. Her “Soldier” portraits have been presented as billboards in American cities and sparked a passionate debate about issues of art and soldiering. Opton’s work lives on the edge between documentary and conceptual and often includes elements of simple performance. Her monograph, Soldier / Many Wars, was published by Decode in Fall 2011. Her photographs are included in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, Fotomuseum, Winterthur, Library of Congress, Musée de l’Elysée, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Portland Art Museum.  She has received grants from the NEA, NYFA, Vermont Council on the Arts, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. While at the Dora Maar House she worked on a new series of narrative images centering on femininity, fertility, aging and family culture.
 


May–June 2012

Jane MacAvock is an art historian based in Paris. She has worked as Curator of Prints and Drawings at the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin.  She has been a visiting scholar at the American Academy in Rome. Dr. MacAvock has also taught at the Université de Haute Bretagne, Rennes II and has written for numerous publications. While at the Dora Maar House, she plans complete over a decade’s worth of research and writing on the 17th-century painter Jean Daret. Her book, when completed, will be the first monographic study of this artist who lived in Aix-en-Provence.
 


April 2012

Rachel Withers holds degrees in Fine Art and the History of European Art and Architecture.  She teaches art practice and theory to undergraduate and postgraduate students.  Withers also works as a freelance critic and art writer and is a frequent contributor to Artforum International, among other publications. She is the author of a monograph on the Swiss artist Roman Signer. While at the Dora Maar House, Withers continued to work on a collaborative project with Signer, provisionally entitled Pictures from an Anonymous Collector’s Library.
 


March 2012

Andria Derstine is Curator of Collections and Curator of European and American Art at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College. She holds a certificate in Executive Education through the Center for Curatorial Leadership from Columbia University Graduate School of Business. She graduated magna cum laude in History and Literature from Harvard University and earned her M.A. and Ph.D. at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. Dr. Derstine was awarded numerous graduate and post-doctoral fellowships, including a Theodore Rousseau Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellowship in the European Paintings Department at the Detroit Institute of Arts. While at the Dora Maar House, Dr. Derstine worked  on a catalogue presenting significant new research on Dubuffet’s 20-year relationship with the Joseph and Enid Bissett, important American art patrons.


March–April 2012

Brian Chikwava is an African writer from Zimbabwe, who is a graduate of the University of the West of England and is currently living in London. His short story Seventh Street Alchemy was awarded the 2004 Caine Prize for African Writing and his debut novel Harare North won the National Arts Merit Award for fiction.  While at the Dora Maar House, Brian worked on his novel-in-progress Chameleon’s Song.