Dora Maar Fellows in Residence

June 2015

Carolle Bénitah was born in Casablanca, Morocco. After graduating from the Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne (Paris, France), Benitah worked as a fashion designer for 10 years. Her recent exhibitions include Le Maroc raconté autrement, Galerie 127, official selection of Month of Photography Paris, Photos Souvenirs, Sous les Étoiles Gallery New York, 10 Contemporary Moroccans Photographers in Museum of Marrakech for Photography, Tisser des liens, Pavillon de Vendôme in Aix en Provence and J1 in the context of Marseille Cultural European Capital Provence 2013. Benitah’s work is part of the collection of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France; theh Museum of Marrakech for Photography; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.


June 2015

Angela Dalle Vacche is a Professor of Film Studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She has authored several books: The Body in The Mirror: Shapes of History in Italian Cinema, Princeton, 1992; Cinema and Painting: How Art is Used in Film, Texas, 1996; Diva: Defiance and Passion in Early Italian Cinema, Texas, 2008; she also produced a few anthologies: The Visual Turn: Art History and Classical Film Theory, Rutgers 2002; co-edited with Brian Price, Color: A Film Reader, Routledge, 2010; Film, Art, New Media: Museum without Walls, 2012. Dalle Vacche is currently working on a new book: Andre Bazin's Cinema: Art, Science, Religion. She has been the recipient of fellowships and grants from Fulbright Committee, and The Mellon, The Rockefeller, and The Leverhulme Foundations.


 


June 2015

Brenda Marie Osbey, a New Orleans native, is an author of poetry and prose nonfiction in English and French. Her books include History and Other Poems (Time Being Books, 2013); All Saints: New and Selected Poems (LSU Press, 1997), which received the American Book Award; Desperate Circumstance, Dangerous Woman (Story Line Press, 1991); In These Houses (Wesleyan University Press, 1988); and Ceremony for Minneconjoux (Callaloo Poetry Series, 1983; University Press of Virginia, 1985). She has been a resident fellow of the MacDowell Colony, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Camargo Foundation and others. She also has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louisiana Division of the Arts, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation, the Langston Hughes Society and others. In 2005 and 2007, she served as the first peer-selected poet laureate of Louisiana. Osbey is currently Distinguished Visiting Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University.
 


May 2015

Alex Jimenez Ruanova's recent compositions reveal folkloric influences from Latin America, and have been performed in several international forums and concert halls. He has received important commissions from music ensembles and orchestras, as well as numerous prizes and recognition. Ruanova has done extensive work producing, organizing, and leading projects, conferences, and master classes. Most recently he received a grant from the minister of culture FONCA–CONACYT in Mexico and was awarded a doctorate in composition at the Akademia Muzyczna w Krakowie, in Poland. During his time at the Dora Maar House, he will work on a composition for a small ensemble based on the play El Hombre Reloj (The Clock Man) by Mexican-American dramatist Juan Trigos.
 


May 2015

Justin Spring, a writer on 20th-century American art and culture, is the author of two interdisciplinary biographies: Fairfield Porter: A Life in Art and Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artist and Sexual Renegade. Both examine the lives of artists whose work combined the practice of visual art with literature, poetry, criticism, and social and political activism. Secret Historian was a National Book Award finalist and the recipient of many other prizes. Spring received the Guggenheim and Leon Levy Biography Fellowships. In addition to his work as a biographer, Spring is an award-winning curator who has published many monographs and museum catalogues, most recently Andy Warhol: Fame and Misfortune. Spring's current biography project, tentatively titled American Gourmands in Paris, looks at the lives of seven American writers who learned about French food and wine from 1945 to 1975, the period remembered in France as les trentes glorieuses.


April 2015

Maureen Cassidy-Geiger is a New Hampshire native living in the orbit of New York City. An internationally recognized curator, scholar and lecturer specializing in European decorative arts, Meissen porcelain and the court of Saxony/Poland under kings August II and August III, her time at the Dora Maar House will be devoted to completing the manuscript for The Grand Cure, an annotated edition of the travel diaries of the disabled Crown Prince of Saxony/Poland, Friedrich Christian (1722-63), who traveled incognito in Italy in 1738-40 (with an entourage of forty) for medical treatments and Catholic indoctrination during an improvised odyssey akin to a Grand Tour. Research on the unpublished diaries has thus far been supported by grants and fellowships from Wellesley College, DAAD, The Getty Museum and Parsons New School University. Cassidy-Geiger has been a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy in Rome and the Fondazione Cini in Venice. Maureen’s book on the history of the Philip Johnson Glass House estate, a National Trust property with eleven structures and a landscape designed by the architect, will be published in 2016.
 


April 2015

Richard Holeton is author of the critically-recognized hypertext novel Figurski at Findhorn on Acid (Eastgate Systems, 2001), other electronic and new media fiction, short stories, and college textbooks. His stories have appeared in Indiana Review, Mississippi Review, ZYZZYVA, Black Ice, and other journals. His electronic literature has been widely performed and exhibited and is anthologized in The Electronic Literature Collection, Vol. 1. Holeton has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the MacDowell Colony, and the California Arts Council. Previously he taught writing for 12 years at Stanford University, where he currently serves as Director of Academic Computing Services.


April–May 2015

Yemane I. Demissie is an awardwinning independent filmmaker whose work includes two narrative feature films, Tumult and Dead Weight and a feature documentary, Twilight Revelations: Episodes in the Life and Times of Emperor Haile Selassie. Currently, Yemane is producing The Quantum Leapers: Ethiopia 1930-1975, a six-part social history documentary series about the Emperor Haile Selassie era. Yemane is an associate professor in the Undergraduate Department of Film & Television at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.  He has received numerous awards for his work including the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, the Walter Mosley Award for Best Documentary, The Berlin Prize, the American Film Institute’s Filmmaker’s Grant, the Paulin Vieyra Merit Award for Outstanding Work in the Cinema, the California Arts Council Artists Fellowship, and the Fonds Sud Writing Grant.  He has also been awarded residencies at Bellagio, MacDowell, Yaddo and Bogliasco.
 


March 2015

Ken Kalfus is the author of three novels: Equilateral (2013), The Commissariat of Enlightenment (2003), and A Disorder Peculiar to the Country, which was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award and appeared in French as Un désordre américain. He has also published two collections of stories, Thirst (1998) and Pu-239 and Other Russian Fantasies (1999), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. Ken has received a Pew Fellowships in the Arts award and a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. He's written for Harper's, The New York Review of Books, and The New York Times. A film adaptation of his short story, "Pu-239," aired on HBO in 2007. His new collection, Coup de Foudre: A Novella and Stories, is set to be published in May 2015.


March 2015

Gavin Morrison is a curator and writer based in Scotland and the south of France, where he runs the project gallery IFF. He is also a director of Atopia Projects, a curatorial and publishing initiative. In 2015–2016 he serves as artistic director of the Skaftfell Centre for Visual Art, Seyðisfjörður, Iceland and previously he was the inaugural curator of Fort Worth Contemporary Arts. He is developing a monographic exhibition on the modernist architect Berthold Lubetkin for Tbilisi, Georgia, and is writing a book concerning cultural continuities between Scotland and Corsica.


March 2015

Seamus Scanlon is a writer from Galway, Ireland and currently based in New York where he is a Carnegie Corporation/ New York Times award winning librarian at the Center for Worker Education (City College). His short fiction collection As Close As You´ll Ever Be (Cairn Press, 2012) established the character of Victor M. McGowan who was the protagonist in the 2014 production of The McGowan Trilogy at the Cell Theatre in New York. The trilogy (published by Arlen House, 2014) won awards for Best Actress, Best Director and Best Design at the annual 1st Irish Theatre Festival in New York. It will also be produced in Galway in June 2015 by Wolf Meets World. The Spanish translation of his collection (Irlanda en el corazón) is due in 2015 from Artepoética Press.  At Maison Dora Maar he is working on his novel in progress - Black Coelacanths. Seamus is a graduate of the City College of New York, the University of West London and the National University of Ireland, Galway.


October–November 2014

Mary Flanagan is an award winning designer, artist, and writer. Her fifth book, Values at Play in Digital Games  was co-authored with Helen Nissenbaum and released in 2014. As an artist, her internationally exhibited works range from game-inspired systems to computer viruses and embodied interfaces to interactive texts. As a scholar interested in how human values are in play across technologies and systems, Flanagan has written more than 20 critical essays and chapters on games, empathy, gender and digital representation, art and technology, and responsible design. Flanagan founded the Tiltfactor game research laboratory in 2003, where researchers study and make social and urban games as well as software in a rigorous theory/practice environment. Flanagan’s work has been supported by grants and commissions including the British Arts Council, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the ACLS, and the National Science Foundation. Flanagan is the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities at Dartmouth College.


October–November 2014

Julie Rose is an internationally renowned translator, whose many translations include Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables, Racine’s Phèdre, André Gortz’s Letter to D., André Schwarz-Bart’s The Morning Star, Alexandre Dumas’s The Knight of Maison-Rouge, more than a dozen works by celebrated urbanist-architect and theorist Paul Virilio, and many other leading French thinkers, such as Jacques Rancière, Chantal Thomas, and Hubert Damisch. She is a recipient of the PEN medallion and the New South Wales Premier’s Translation Prize. Rose is also an essayist and critic with a strong interest in the arts, cities, and dogs. She has lived in Paris and Hong Kong but is now based in her hometown of Sydney, Australia.
 


October 2014

Aryn Kyle's debut novel, The God of Animals, was an international bestseller and the winner of an American Library Association's ALEX Award. Her short story collection Boys and Girls Like You and Me included fiction which originally appeared in Atlantic Monthly, Ploughshares, and Best American Short Stories, 2007. Kyle is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Award and a National Magazine Award in fiction. Her new novel, Hinterland, is forthcoming from Riverhead. She lives in New York City.


September 2014

Nina Burleigh is an award-winning investigative journalist and the author of five books. Her last book, The Fatal Gift of Beauty, was a New York Times bestseller. She is working on a book about American spies in dolce vita Rome. In the last several years, she has covered a wide array of subjects, from American politics to the Arab Spring. She writes the “Bombshell” column at The New York Observer and has written for numerous publications including Rolling Stone, Businessweek, The New Yorker, Time, New York, and The New York Times. Nina was born and educated in the Midwest, and she has traveled extensively in the Middle East and lived in Italy and France. Her book, Mirage (Harper Collins, 2008) was selected by The New York Times as an editors' choice and won the Society of Women Educators' Award in 2008.
 


September 2014

Cynthia Lin was born in Taiwan and grew up near Chicago, Illinois. She lives in New York and works in Bushwick/Queens. A John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 2006 allowed her to mount a solo show at Michael Steinberg Gallery, New York, where she exhibited monumental drawings of skin and scars. This led to group shows at Lehmann Maupin Gallery, Garis & Hahn Gallery, DeCordova Museum, Minneapolis Institute of Art, The National Academy of Design, The Drawing Center, ISE Cultural Foundation, and Weatherspoon Art Museum. She has received residency fellowships at Yaddo, The MacDowell Colony, The Space Program at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation, Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Blue Mountain Center, and the Visiting Artists and Scholars Program at the American Academy in Rome. She is an assistant professor of art at Purchase College, State University of New York. While at the Dora Maar House, she works on drawings of scars within and beyond the body.
 


August–September 2014

Poet and performance-maker Fiona Templeton directs the New York performance group The Relationship. She created the 1988 landmark work YOU-The City, “an intimate Manhattan-wide play for an audience of one,” and cofounded the Theatre of Mistakes in London in the 1970s. Her recent productions include The Medead at Roulette Brooklyn, on Governor’s Island, and at Glasgow Tramway; L’Ile, a staging of the dreams of the people of Lille, France, in the places dreamed of; Flow by Leslie Scalapino; and Bodies of Memory, a collective physical remembering of performances from the last 35 years, at Tate Britain. Her 12 books include YOU-The City, Cells of Release, Delirium of Interpretations, and Elements of Performance Art. She has received awards and fellowships from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, NYFA, in both performance and playwriting; the NEA, in both poetry and visual arts; and a Senior Judith Wilson Writer’s Fellowship at Cambridge. She teaches contemporary performance at Brunel University in London.


August 2014

Samuel Leader was born in South Africa, grew up in the United Kingdom and France, and has lived in the United States since 2001. He holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and modern languages from the University of Oxford and an MFA in fiction from UC Irvine. He was awarded a fiction fellowship twice from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and he was also was a writer in residence at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council in 2011. He teaches in the literary arts department at the Rhode Island School of Design. While at the Dora Maar House, he works on his novel entitled Dust, which is set in Southern France and has as its protagonist an aged demographer on trial for crimes against humanity.


August 2014

Patricia Trieb was born in Saginaw, Michigan, and lives and works in Brooklyn. Solo exhibitions of her work have been held at Wallspace, New York (2013), Tibor de Nagy, New York (2012), and Golden Gallery, Chicago (2010). Selected group exhibitions include Modern Talking at the Cluj Museum, Cluj, Romania (2012); Expanded Painting, Prague Biennale 5, Prague, Czech Republic (2011); Besides, With, Against, And Yet: Abstraction and The Ready-Made Gesture at The Kitchen, New York (2009). Treib was a 2013 MacDowell Colony Fellow and a Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation grantee in 2007. She received her MFA from Columbia University and her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.


July 2014

Milagros de la Torre has been working with the photographic medium since 1991. Her first solo exhibition, curated by Robert Delpire, was presented at the Palais de Tokyo, Centre National de la Photographie, Paris. After an artist residence grant from the Cité des Arts, Paris (1995), she received the Rockefeller Foundation Artist Grant and was awarded the Romeo Martinez Photography Prize and the Young Iberoamerican Creators Prize for her series The Lost Steps. De la Torre received the Guggenheim Fellowship in Creative Arts, Photography, in 2011. Her work has been exhibited extensively and is part of permanent museum collections in Europe and America. Two important monographs have been recently published: Milagros de la Torre. Photographs 19912011’by Toluca Editions (Paris), RM Editorial (México/Barcelona) and Ediciones Lariviére (Argentina) with a text by Marta Gili, Director of the Jeu de Paume Museum, Paris; and Observed, co-published by the Americas Society, New York, and the Museo de Arte de Lima with an interview between the artist and Anne Wilkes Tucker, The Gus and Lyndell Wortham Curator of Photography at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Born in Lima, Peru, de la Torre lives and works in New York.
 


July 2014

Goldie Goldbloom's novel, The Paperbark Shoe, won the AWP Novel Award (2008) and Novel of the Year from the Independent Publishers' Association. Her collection of short stories, You Lose These and other stories, was published by Fremantle Press in Australia, and her fiction has appeared in Prairie Schooner, Kenyon Review, Tri-Quarterly, and Narrative Magazine. She was a recent recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and spoke at the International Forum on the Novel in 2013. She writes the blog Frum Gay Girl, a series of interviews with LGBT Orthodox Jews. She is a professor of creative writing at Northwestern University. Goldie was born in Western Australia but currently lives in Chicago, Illinois, with her eight children.
 


July 2014

Kathleen Winter’s debut poetry collection, Nostalgia for the Criminal Past (Elixir Press, 2012), won the Antivenom Prize and 2013 Texas Institute of Letters Bob Bush Memorial Award. She has received residency fellowships from James Merrill House Foundation, Vermont Studio Center, and the Prague Summer Program. Her poetry was featured for a year in the City of Phoenix, Seventh Avenue Streetscape Public Arts Project 2010. Kathleen holds an MFA from Arizona State University; JD from the University of California, Davis; MA from Boston College; and BA from the University of Texas at Austin. Her poems appear in such journals as The New Republic, Tin House, Poetry London, AGNI, Stand and The Cincinnati Review. She teaches at Napa Valley College.


June 2014

Christina Davis is the author of Forth A Raven (Alice James Books, 2006), which was hailed as a “head-turning debut” by Publishers Weekly, and the award-winning An Ethic (Nightboat Books, 2013).  She currently serves as curator of the Woodberry Poetry Room, Harvard University. While at the Dora Maar House she will be working on her third collection of poems and a sequence of lyric essays.
 


June 2014

Madeline Djerejian is a visual artist born in the U.S. and raised in Lebanon, Greece, and Saudi Arabia. Her silent videos and photographic works explore have been exhibited internationally, including Manifesta 8 (Murcia, Spain), Elastic Residence (London), and Art Park Projects (Dubai). While at the Dora Maar House, Madeline will work on a silent video of text and images titled “The Happy Man … or so I have heard myself called.”
 


June 2014

Brian Nelson is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.  He is best known for his critical studies and translations of the novels of Emile Zola. These include The Cambridge Companion to Zola, Zola and the Bourgeoisie and translations (for Oxford World’s Classics) of The Fortune of the Rougons, The Belly of Paris, The Kill, Pot Luck and The Ladies’ Paradise.  While at the Dora Maar House, Brian will be working on The Cambridge Introduction to French Literature.
 


May 2014

Tracy Xavia Karner, PhD, is an author, curator, and visual sociologist. She has authored numerous articles and essays exploring visual and cultural perspectives with regard to photography, art aesthetics, gender, mental health, and social policy. She is the Chair of the Sociology Department at University of Houston. While at the Dora Maar House, Xavia will be working on a book project, “Genesis of an Art World: The creation, growth and flourishing of the Houston Photography Community.”
 


May 2014

As a writer and collaborator with numerous directors and composers, Michel Pastore’s life work has been to rehabilitate the musical patrimony annilated by the 3rd Reich. Since 2006, he has been the director of the Festival of Forbidden Music in Marseille. While at the Dora Maar House, Michel plans to write a libretto based on Anna Seghurs’ novel Transit, for the composer Philippe Hersant.


April–May 2014

Alice Miceli received a BA from the Ecole Superieure d'Etudes Cinematographiques, in Paris, and an MA from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro. Her work has been exhibited in numerous international venues, including the Sao Paulo Biennial; the Japan Media Arts Festival inTokyo; the TRANSITIO_MX festival in Mexico City; the transmediale festival in Berlin; the Sydney Film Festival; Z33 Contemporary Art Space in Belgium, the Images Festival in Toronto; the Mediations Biennial in Poland, and at ZKM in Karlsruhe, among others. She has had solo exhibitions at Nara Roesler Gallery and the Tomie Ohtake Institute in Sao Paulo, and at Max Protetch Gallery in New York. Alice is a recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, and the Bogliasco Foundation, among others. During her fellowship, Alice plans to work on the final stages editing her exploration of photographic representations of landmines.
 


April 2014

James Cañón was born and raised in Colombia. He received his MFA from Columbia University. His debut novel, Tales from the Town of Widows & Chronicles from the Land of Men, has been translated into 11 languages, published in over 20 countries, and made into a film. He won the Prix du Premier Meilleur Roman Étranger, and the Prix des Lecteurs de Vincennes, and is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships, including the Henfield Prize for Excellence in Fiction, an NYFA artist fellowship, and residency fellowships from MacDowell, Yaddo, Blue Mountain Center, and Hawthornden International Retreat for Writers, among others. James’s short stories and essays have appeared in various literary journals in the United States, Mexico, France, Belgium, and Colombia. He serves as graduate thesis advisor at Columbia University’s creative writing department. While at Dora Maar House, James plans to work on his forthcoming novel, The Church of Common Sense.
 


April 2014

Luljeta Lleshanaku  was born in Elbasan, Albania. She studied Albanian philology & literature at the University of Tirana and later received an MFA from Warren Wilson College, in the United States. She has worked as a schoolteacher, literary magazine editor, screenwriter, television author, and researching director of the Institute of Study of the Communist Genocide in Albania. She was awarded fellowships at the University of Iowa international writing program in 1999 and at Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in 2008–2009. She is the author of six books of poetry in the Albanian language and the author of six poetry collections in other languages: Antipastoral (2006, Italy); Kinder der natur (2010, Austria); Dzieci natury (2011, Poland); Haywire: New & Selected Poems (Bloodaxe Books, 2011, UK); Fresco: Selected Poems (New Directions, 2002, U.S.), and Child of Nature (New Directions, 2010, U.S.). She has received wide recognition and awards for her work internationally. At the Dora Maar House, she plans to work on a collection of poems as a response to three generations of family photos.


March 2014

Maren Stange is professor of American studies and visual culture at the Cooper Union in New York. Her publications on photography and its social contexts include Bare Witness: Photographs by Gordon Parks; Bronzeville: Black Chicago in Pictures; Symbols of Ideal Life: Social Documentary Photography in America, 18901950; Official Images: New Deal Photography; and the forthcoming Photography and the End of Segregation. She has held fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Yale University, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Durham University, England, and has lectured widely in Europe and America. At the Dora Maar House she is working on completing Photography and the End of Segregation.


 


March 2014

Joel Dreyfuss has been editor-in-chief of technology publications Red Herring and Information Week, editor of PC Magazine, a senior writer at Bloomberg Markets, managing editor of TheRoot.com, executive editor of Black Enterprise, and editor-in-chief of Urban Box Office, an Internet startup. He also served two stints at Fortune magazine, first as an associate editor and Tokyo bureau chief, and later as a senior editor and personal technology columnist. Joel’s freelance articles have appeared in the New York Times Magazine and Book Review, the Los Angeles Times, Redbook, The Progressive, and other national publications. He is an accomplished musician with credits as a sideman on several albums. He is a cofounder of the National Association of Black Journalists and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. While at the Dora Maar House, he is working on a book about the 300-year history of his family in Haiti.
 


March 2014

Laura Talamante is an associate professor of history at California State University, Dominguez Hills. She earned her PhD in history at UCLA, where her dissertation, “Les Citoyennes Marseillaises: Women and Political Change during the French Revolution,” won the Mary Wollstonecraft Dissertation Award. Talamante's other numerous honors and awards include a residency fellowship at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France; a National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture grant; and two French American Cultural Exchange Tournée Festival of French Films grants. While at the Dora Maar House, she is working on a collaborative manuscript with French colleagues titled Sex, Scandal and Power Relations: From Marseille to Venice, Conjugal Disturbances, Elites and Society in the Eighteenth Century.