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  1. 15 Dec
    Thu / 2011
    I arrived at Rienzi a few minutes early this morning, coffee in one hand, my lunch of leftover saag paneer in the other. I was a little on edge, for my a.m. drive in was unnecessarily stressful. When I entered my office, which is an off-view bedroom at Rienzi, nick-named the Septapus Room after a psychedelic seven armed octopus that is painted on the walls, ironically, I felt an instant calm. Psychedelic murals aside, the Septapus...

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  2. 07 Dec
    Wed / 2011
    On Thursday, December 1st Rienzi hosted a conversation with Megan and James Silk, two-thirds of the trio from Feast Restaurant on lower Westhemier. Feast is a European-style restaurant that follows a “nose-to-tail” philosophy, advocating for the consumption of the whole animal, no bits left behind. At the reception before the main event, Feast provided the 60 guests with a course of hors d’oeuvres from their restaurant. Later on in the program, they revealed...

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  3. 17 Nov
    Thu / 2011
    Because one scoop of ice cream blog post is never enough, here’s a bit more on dessert equipage from the eighteenth century… As part of our installation devoted to the dessert service, we have on view an ice pail, made by the Worcester Porcelain Manufactory in 1770. This intricately decorated vessel is very much what it sounds like – it is a pail made to hold ice and chill food.  Designed in three parts, ice would...

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  4. 15 Nov
    Tue / 2011
    If you enjoy an ice cream cone now and again (and we hope that you do), you might be interested to learn that ice cream was a favored dessert in European circles as early as the seventeenth century. As part of our exhibition English Taste, Rienzi has on view a series of porcelain objects from eighteenth-century dessert services, two of which were made specifically for ice cream.  If the thought of 300 year old ice cream...

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  5. 14 Nov
    Mon / 2011
    If you have visited Rienzi to see English Taste: The Art of Dining in the Eighteenth Century, you have probably noticed a dish on the table vaguely resembling green beans. Rienzi’s docents often receive the question, “what’s that?” accompanied by an index finger aimed at the mass of unfamiliar green vegetation. The answer to the common query is samphire. What, you might ask, is samphire? Samphire, officially Crithmum maritimum but also known as crest...

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